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Galileo / FitzRoy Combo Weather Station

Item Number: 3153998

Price: $37.95




This item is available for giftwrap!


- Wood framed desk display contains bot a Galileo thermometer and a FitzRoy storm glass.

- Measures 8" high



Galileo Meets Darwin in this Smart Executive Desk Display

Combining a Galileo thermometer with FitzRoy’s storm glass, this gorgeous weather station instantly adds sophistication to any office or study. This unique combination of traditional weather gauges is historic, functional and stylish. Measures 8" high .    

Historic Background:

The Storm Glass Barometer came into general use in the early 1700's. Sailor's attached this instrument to the mast of their ships and bu interpretation of the constantly changing crystal formations, relied upon it to forecast good weather and forboding conditions at sea.  On his voyage with Charles Darwin on the HMS Beagle, Admiral Robert FitzRoy used a storm barometer of his own design to predict changes in the weather. He refined the chemical formulation and published observational guidelines that are included with this item.

WARNING: This instrument should be handled with care and kept out of the reach of children. Contents contain flammable liquid and should be kept away from combustable material.

The ‘Galileo’ thermometer is so-named as Galileo surmised that the density of a liquid changes in proportion to its temperature- the principle on which this instrument functions.

The Galilean thermometer works due to the principle of buoyancy, a force exerted by a fluid that opposes an object's weight. As the temperature of the air outside the thermometer changes, the temperature of the water surrounding the bubbles also changes. When the temperature of the water changes, it either expands or contracts, changing its density. Each bubble also differs slightly in density from the other bubbles. The bubble that sinks the most indicates the approximate current temperature.

Named for “The father of modern observational astronomy,” Galileo Galilei, an Italian physicist and astronomer responsible for many astronomical advancements. The liquid inside the thermometer is actually a mixture of water and paraffin oil.

WARNING: This instrument should be handled with care and kept out of the reach of children. Contents contain flammable liquid and should be kept away from combustible material.



SKU 3153998

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